2018-03-29Press release

Field robot wins the second prize at the euRobotics Awards 2018

Fendt Xaver, the small robot unit, has already proven itself in the field. The initial research project of the field robot, MARS, has now been awarded with the 2018 Technology Transfer Award, thereby receiving scientific recognition from Europe’s robotic technology industry.

2018-03-29Press release

Field robot wins the second prize at the euRobotics Awards 2018

Fendt Xaver, the small robot unit, has already proven itself in the field. The initial research project of the field robot, MARS, has now been awarded with the 2018 Technology Transfer Award, thereby receiving scientific recognition from Europe’s robotic technology industry.

The winners of the 2018 euRobotics Technology Transfer Awards.
Prof. Schlegel (left) from the MARS research team from Hochschule Ulm.
Thiemo Buchner, Project Manager MARS/Fendt Xaver in the area Fendt Research & Advanced Engineering.



“We are very happy to receive this award! We also want to use this chance to congratulate our team members from the Hochschule Ulm. It was a pleasure working with them. Fendt Xaver is a product of robotic research in combination with the latest knowledge from agricultural engineering and farming”, says Thiemo Buchner, who is the Project Manager MARS/Fendt Xaver in the area Fendt Research & Advanced Engineering.

The European Robotic Forum is a yearly event which takes place in the Finnish town of Tampere. As part of this event, a jury rewards outstanding innovations from the European robot technology, which are the result of a successful cooperation between research and industry. This year, more than 800 experts from all over Europe took part in the European Robotic Forum, where the Fendt field robot won the second prize.

“Fendt Xaver is the best example of how a research project from a college can make its way into the professional practice of an industry”, says Thiemo Buchner.


Three years ago, AGCO/Fendt launched the EU funded project MARS in cooperation with the Hochschule Ulm. When the project ended, the robot development went into advance development at Fendt. Since then, it has been further researched and developed at Fendt, under the name of Fendt Xaver. The idea behind Fendt’s field robot is to use small robots operating in swarms and using a cloud-based solution to plan, monitor and accurately document the precise planting of corn.


For more information about Fendt Xaver, click here:

Fendt Xaver